Project Overview

EFENIS Structure and Tasks
EFENIS Main Activities
EFENIS Demonstration Results
EFENIS Software Tools Developed
EFENIS Final Publishable Report

EFENIS Structure and Tasks

EFENIS Project technical themes cover
i) wider-scope total site integration methodology,
ii) computer-aided optimisation framework,
iii) intensified heat transfer
iv) waste heat recovery, v) district heating energy integration with renewables sources,
vi) total site-wide carbon management and decarbonised energy

The schematic below shows the Project activities and their interactions

EFENIS schematic

Being a demonstration project, EFENIS follows a unified approach towards demonstration activities at each demonstration site as shown in the figure below

EFENIS demonstration schematic

In order to facilitate the access to the results, a commented section is provided below. It describes the EFENIS project’s main activities, most relevant project deliverable reports and publications of each of the Project topics.

* – Report or Public Summary publication pending subject to approval by the European Commission, expected end November 2014

EFENIS Main Activities

Table 1 Research and demonstration activities and reports

 

EFENIS main research and demonstration activities

Objectives of the activity

Publications covering the activity

Total site integration and optimisation technology
  • Gaining in-depth understanding of site-wide management of heat (steam) and power (electricity)
  • Provision of conceptual insights and design guidelines for the design and operation of site utility systems
  • Application of a novel conceptual design method based on reverse approach
  • Achieving high energy efficiency and cost-effectiveness of energy systems for a site
  • Developing a systematic procedure for efficient and reliable energy demand calculation by quantifying uncertainty in data and simulations
  • To design a systematic framework for minimizing site energy consumption using multi-criteria and multi-objective optimisation approach under uncertainty
  • To implement the methodologies developed into software tools
3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10,13, 14, 18, 21, 22, 24, D1.1, D1.3-Public Summary, D1.4, D1.5-Public Summary, D1.6 – Public Summary, D1.7-Public Summary, 28, 29, 30, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, D1.8-Public Summary, D1.9-Public Summary, D1.10-Public Summary, D1.11-Public Summary
Total site carbon management and decarbonised energy
  • To improve dramatically the side-wide carbon management
  • To implement a sound approach to decarbonised energy within the total site
  • To consolidate research into an operational EMS software system – based on existing proprietary systems
  • To Improved integrate EFENIS multivariate mathematical models and enhanced data frequency, quality and reliability allow for improved analysis
  • To ensure industry adapted IT-system interfaces will enable integration with known industrial automation, facility management and ERP systems.
D2.1-Public Summary, D2.2-Public SummaryD2.3-Public SummaryD2.4-Public Summary, D2.5-Public Summary
Total site waste heat recovery with intensified heat transfer
  • To identify and select waste heat sources for total site integration
  • To select and extend the technology for heat recovery for total site integration
  • To develop a design methodology for introduction CHP into the total site context
15, 16, 17, 23, D3.1D3.4-Public Summary, D3.2, D3.3, 43, D3.4-Public Summary, D3.5-Public Summary, D3.6-Public Summary
Integration with local CHP and district heating energy systems
  • Development of a design methodology which systematically integrates a range of heat and power generation technologies from micro-scale to macro-scale applications within locally-integrated distributed energy systems
  • Development of an energy targeting procedure which provides realistic potentials for energy saving in distributed energy systems
  • Development of a novel top-down approach which effectively screens and evaluates potential integrated design options in heat and power generation
  • Building a knowledge base (i.e. design guidelines and conceptual insights), which is readily applicable for industrial practitioners to employ for the design and planning of distributed energy systems
1, 2, 7, 8, 11,12, 25, D4.1, D4.2, 27, 31, 33, 41
Energy Integration Manager
  • Definition of criteria when to update a total site analysis based on incremental changes of the underlying heat stream data
  • Development of an algorithm for an efficient integration of changes of heat stream data into an existing total site analysis
  • Implementation of an Energy Integration Manager tool
26, D11.1-Public Summary, D11.2-Public SummaryD11.3-Public Summary, 32, D11.4-Public Summary
Demonstration – Putting into practice total site energy management for the chemical industry
  • Implementation of the methods and tools developed during the Project
  • Research at a large-scale industrial production site in the chemical industry
  • This enables the real-life validation of the project findings, results, and tools as well as the quantification of the benefits compared to standard procedures.
  • Furthermore, the implementation activities will accompany method and tool development and provide valuable feedback to enhance the practical applicability of research activities.
D5.1-Public Summary, D5.2-Public Summary, D5.3-Public Summary, D5.4-Public Summary, D5.6-Public Summary, D5.7-Public Summary,
D5.8-Public Summary,
D5.9-Public Summary
Demonstration – Putting into practice: total site energy management for oil refinery
  • Implementation of the methods and tools developed during the Project
  • Research at a large-scale industrial production site in the refinery
  • This enables the real-life validation of the project findings, results, and tools as well as the quantification of the benefits compared to standard procedures.
  • Furthermore, the implementation activities will accompany method and tool development and provide valuable feedback to enhance the practical applicability of research activities.
19, 20, D6.1-Public Summary, D6.2-Public Summary,
Demonstration – Putting into practice: total site energy management for coal-to-chemicals
  • Implementation of the methods and tools developed during the Project
  • Research at a large-scale industrial production site in coal-to-chemicals industry
  • This enables the real-life validation of the project findings, results, and tools as well as the quantification of the benefits compared to standard procedures.
  • Furthermore, the implementation activities will accompany method and tool development and provide valuable feedback to enhance the practical applicability of research activities.
D7.1-Public Summary, D7.2-Public Summary,
Demonstration – Putting into practice: total site energy management for CHP and district heating
  • Implementation of the methods and tools developed during the Project
  • Research at a large-scale industrial production site in the refinery integrated with district heating system
  • This enables the real-life validation of the project findings, results, and tools as well as the quantification of the benefits compared to standard procedures.
  • Furthermore, the implementation activities will accompany method and tool development and provide valuable feedback to enhance the practical applicability of research activities.
D8.1-Public Summary, D8.2-Public Summary,

EFENIS Demonstration Results

Reduction of GHG emissions, primary energy use and related costs
The results energy savings and CO2 emission reductions obtained from application of EFENIS technology at four Project demonstration sites, can be summarized in Table 2.

Table 2. EFENIS-derived energy savings and GHG emission reductions

Parameter \ Demonstration Site No.

Site 1

Site 2

Site 3

Site 4

Energy Input
PJ/y 4.0 7.0 2.16 2.0
M€ 68.32 119.56 0.200 0.180
GHG Emissions
Mt 0.330 0.820 0.200 0.180
M€ GHG 7.70 19.13 0.24 4.20
BAT overall measures* savings
PJ/y 0.089 1.576 0.48 0,200
M€ energy-related 1.5 27.0 8.48 1.67
Mt GHG 0.010 0.175 0.084 0.035
M€ GHG emissions-related 0.170 4.304 0.055 0.42
-of which economically/technologically feasible at present
PJ/y 0.039 0.262 0.013 N/A
M€ energy-related 0.657 4.489 0.230 N/A
Mt GHG 0.004 0.029 0.001 N/A
M€ GHG emissions-related 0.068 0.713 0.0007 N/A
EFENIS overall measures savings
PJ/y 0.316 0.722 0.500 0.779
M€ energy-related 5.4 12.33 8.43 8.11
Mt GHG 0.033 0.078 0.019 0.030
M€ GHG emissions-related 0.77 1.820 0.576 0.99
-of which economically/technologically feasible at present
PJ/y 0.044 0.348 0.175 0.278
M€ energy-related 0.752 5.943 2.950 2.894
Mt GHG 0.005 0.039 0.005 0.007
M€ GHG emissions-related 0.117 0.910 0.152 0.231
Savings overall BAT % 2.2 22.5 22.2 10.0
Savings EFENIS derived % 7.9 10.3 23.1 13.9

Although the savings potential of demo site 2 is considerably high, the evaluation of the derived projects showed only scarce economic potential due to a difficult technical feasibility as several production processes need to be interconnected.

Although the savings potential of demo site 2 is considerably high, the evaluation of the derived projects showed only scarce economic potential due to a difficult technical feasibility as several production processes need to be interconnected.

There are many factors which influence the energy price: taxes, levies, non-tax levies, fees and other fiscal charges which all differ from country to country (not to mention different costs of steam/electricity generation). Therefore a common energy price is not very meaningful. Nevertheless, to have a common ground for comparison of results, we assumed a common steam price of EUR 35/t (www.fug-ulm.de/), for electricity 100 EUR/MWh (www.statista.com/statistics/263262/industrial-sector-electricity.prices-in-selected-european-countries). With these assumptions in mind, the financial benefits of EFENIS approach are shown in Table 2.

 

Sector-wise potential impact of the Project (Table 3)

Table 3. Potential EFENIS derived impact across the targeted sectors**

Chemical, Petrochemical, Refinery sectors Energy Input* GHG Emissions* Savings BAT Savings EFENIS-derived weighed means EFENIS potential energy saving, 5% intake EFENIS potential GHG saving, 5% intake EFENIS theoretical potential energy saving EFENIS theoretical potential GHG saving
EJ Mt % % PJ Mt PJ Mt
World 33.62 928 10 16.5 277.4 7.7 5547 153.1
Europe 6.09 165.8*** 10 16.5 50.24 1.37 1004.9 27.35

* IEA petrochemical scenarios for 2030 -2050: Energy Technology Perspectives http://www.iea.org/Textbase/nptable/2007/tracking_t2_1.pdf, http://www.iea.org/ Textbase/nptable/2007/tracking_f2_3.pdf
** In the simplified analysis, a 5% take-up (2008 values) has been assumed and compared to the theoretical potential of a 100% take-up with respect to the scale of post project deployment.
*** The chemical industry in the UK – market and climate change challengeshttp://www.tyndall.ac.uk/sites/default/files/chemical_industry_in_the_uk_-_final.pdf

EFENIS Software Tools Developed

A number of software tools to address different aspects of total site energy integration have been developed which were further on combined in EFENIS toolbox (click here for external link). Since the modules developed by the project partners retain the copyrights of those partners, the user needs to obtain the licenses of the modules with which the user is going to work. For this purpose, contact details of the authors of the modules are provided in this report and in the toolbox itself.

Software for total site targeting and optimisation (EFENIS-Site)
EFENIS-Site is a software package for the design of site utility and cogeneration systems. The interactions between the processes on the site and the steam system, steam turbines, gas turbines (with auxiliary firing options), boiler house, local fired heaters and cooling systems are all analysed using EFENIS-Site. Issues addressed by EFENIS-Site include: (i) Understanding site utility infrastructures; (ii) Optimising existing utility system configurations; (iii) Targeting cogeneration potential; (iv) Choosing the most appropriate cogeneration system; (v) Optimising site steam pressures and loads; (vi) Design and operation of steam turbine networks; (vii) Minimising energy costs for the site; (viii) Reducing flue gas emissions from the site.
Contact:

RS

Data Reconciliation Software
This software can reconcile measured values of a production environment and can remove measurement failures. The program takes into account every result of the last measurement period and determines the true value of the measured values on the basis of their potential.
Contact:

PV

Software for optimal design of heat stations (EFENIS IHM)
The software enables to provide the data for the implementation of improving steps for district heating. The developed software provides the design of individual heat substations for radiator heating and hot water supply for micro-districts, group of buildings and separate domestic houses in scope of acting operation requirements for DH of observed area.
Contact:

sodrut

Energy Integration Manager tool (ENIGMA)
In the state-of-the-art engineering workflow of investment projects for structural modifications of individual process units updating of these process models is obligatory. This means that typically any significant process change that affects heat integration and utility demand involves updating of the process models as a very early planning step. Therefore, an efficient and sustainable workflow for assuring a long term validity of total site analysis results has to be based on a generic interface between process models and the EFENIS optimisation framework. Such an Energy Integration Manager tool requires the development of the tracking and updating methodology considering the following aspects. (i)Definition of criteria when to update a total site analysis or when are previous potentials outdated; (ii) Generic procedure for handling of new heat streams; (iii) Generic procedure for handling changes to local (auxiliary) utility systems on process level (e.g. new local steam level, waste heat utilisation for chilled water, etc.); (iv) Monitoring of current heat integration concepts regarding effectiveness; (v) Updating of previously identified integration projects due to changes in a process; (vi) Determination of suitable sub-networks in the total site superstructure
Contact:

GF

Software for innovative cooling tower design (ICOOL PRO)
The main feature of this software is to find a fan for coolers. The software has a built in library of different fan manufacturers. Initial known values should be put in the software and then it automatically gives an array of results. Preferred fan type according to the noise, blade, size (diameter), RPM and air volume can be selected. The software generates a report which will includes all the parameters and the fan type information.
Contact:

CI

Model Library for Energy Generation Technologies
The models presented consist of a set of equations providing for the operation of each component of the system modelled. Apart from the equations, engineering references should be used by the user for data extraction or estimation from chemical databases containing fluid properties. Another source of information the user may find extremely useful is manufacturer data for component operational characteristics.
Contact:

Dm

EFENIS Security Module
The Security Infrastructure designed for the EFENIS project has been integrated to secure the access to the EFENIS Demo Web Portal via the use of Digital Certificates.
Contact:

OM

Reference to STRUCTese ®
Besides direct links to the software modules developed by the project partners as foreground of EFENIS project, the toolbox also refers to Bayer’s (Covestro’s after the end of the project) relevant software/methodology previously developed and used as a background in the project.
Contact:

KV

EFENIS Final Publishable Report

Click here to download